Conceptual loo rolls.

Writing under lockdown can feel like trying to thread a broken needle. Adjusting to Covid-19 is a full-time job. This week’s been especially tough. A nation red raw with grief confronted by a government intent on rubbing salt into the collective wound. Somehow, I’ve taken to making proboscises (the nose of a mammal, usually long and mobile) out of cardboard tubes. It looks simple (and it is certainly makeshift) but it’s complex conceptually – I promise.

I wear my beret because this is a long story, as old as time.

It has taken a disaster to teach me how to wear a beret like my grandfather. It sits on top of my shaven head and feels suddenly right, after 4 years of thinking it was too small. A child’s beret! I thought. That was before we crossed a red line and I shaved my head too close, all on the same day.

Giving is getting: the social ‘cure’ for autism (the power dynamics exposed).

As I write, a vast clump of anti-welcomes forms before my eyes, like a scrap metal tower teetering up into the sky. I tilt my neck, but I cannot see the top.

It sounds like an exaggeration – I wish it was. The truth is that the current neurological hegemony practices daily micro-aggressions in which autistic people are not welcomed. They’re also barred from giving in the mainstream of life.

Some of us experience just enough welcome (important to acknowledge a relative privilege) and gain the tools with which to carve a niche. But too many don’t. Every human needs a baseline of welcome, and access to the power of giving.

Performance 1. Performance as autistic embodiment and research.

I’m tempted to leave this video right here without any words. Who needs words when embodiment is so infinitely more expressive? It’s at such moments that I remind myself that words can only translate experience. Yet the need to translate is there. Even for myself. I need to process what this powerful embodiment means. Writing helps.Continue reading “Performance 1. Performance as autistic embodiment and research.”

Making it through.

My last post was about waiting for Arts Council England (ACE) to make a decision on my project. Funding from public money in the arts is limited and brings a great responsibility to the recipient. So I feel incredibly fortunate to have been awarded funding under the Grants for the Arts scheme, and will give myContinue reading “Making it through.”

Waiting for an Arts Council decision

My process of application to Art Council England (ACE) is coming to a close and I will be documenting it in the final two weeks. Even though it is statistically more probable that I won’t be successful I want the decision to be visible. I have some serious questions about the process, having gone throughContinue reading “Waiting for an Arts Council decision”

The music of my body: a humorous take on dealing with Arts Council Funding stress.

This video was made in the throes of my application to Arts Council England and as part of a more serious conversation about the difficulties of access for neurodivergent artists. I felt it was time to let off a bit of steam. Feedback so far is that it is hilarious. “51 second of joy” BrentContinue reading “The music of my body: a humorous take on dealing with Arts Council Funding stress.”