Red lines and the echoes of history; police brutality and the Catalan question.

I am not Catalan but I feel the recent events in Spain very deeply. I am an Anglo-British daughter of a Spanish Republican exile born in Madrid. My grandfather was from Galicia and my grandmother from Southern Spain, but they returned from their exile in France in 1941 to live in Barcelona. This place was my home from home as I grew up. Barcelona was my long Summers’ idyl, the city of all my high days and holidays, and my absolute love.

I have written often in my art blog about the long erasure of the Spanish exiles from the history books of Spain, and how my father and my grandparents never spoke of their internment in the French camps of Argelès sur Mer and Barcarès. I didn’t know or question why I lived in two places, or why my grandmother wept so bitterly in her kitchen each time we returned to England.

This is what violent political repression does – it silences you. Not just in the streets with batons. No. The erasure of memory and the taping of tongues creeps deeply into the everyday fabric of our lives. In many ways the invisible brutality of a dictatorship is at the heart of my recent cycle of paintings called simply, Buenos Días Dictador.

The dictator is everywhere and nowhere. The dictator follows you wherever you go.

The Catalan question itself is too complex for me to write about. I am an artist, not a historian or political analyst. But I know about living with exile. I know about suppression. And I know what’s more that these wounds run so deep in Spain that even 81 years on from the start of that Civil War it is hard to talk about Spain. Mine is a postmemory experience. My contact with the history is indirect, but my fear is present and real.

I have changed my social media settings to share this blog post.

The Catalan question can be hard to grasp, but you can recognise state suppression when you see it. All the hallmarks are there – and it’s impossible to argue with the statement by Barcelona’s mayor Ada Colau. A line has been crossed and Rajoy is not fit to serve. Like so many bullies before him he is a coward, one who has set armed police against an unarmed citizenry.

There have been many opportunities to negotiate, which is what democracies are made for.  Democracy is talking. Democracy can never be throwing citizens around like rag dolls, breaking their fingers, kicking and batting them with truncheons. Someone has died I believe, and more than 800 injured.

Most sickeningly there have been statements by Rajoy and his deputy claiming a proportionate  response. But, no. This is not ‘normal’ or right.

With my art practice I witness. It’s all I can do.

 

 

Published by soniaboue

I am an artist.

7 thoughts on “Red lines and the echoes of history; police brutality and the Catalan question.

  1. Sonia, yo conoci a un Republicano. Mi papa era un escritor quien quiso entrevistarle Al Don Domingo. Domingo rehuso. Tuvo Gran miedo, y eso en Los 60’s.Algun dia pienso escribir lo que mi papa me conto acerca de Don Domingo,un Valenciano, albanil El. Saludos y mantente!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I am half cuban, so I know what you mean about exile, and about the remnants or ‘postmemories’ of politically induced, by dictatorships. I have not been able to directly address this in my practice, it is too big and too mixed up: I am of european descent born in the Americas. I am in exile from my own country (where I was born and raised), I am also a cultural migrant. I can’t begin to process all that yet.
    But you are brave. Keep bearing witness!

    Liked by 2 people

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