Masking and caring – an #actuallyautistic perspective.

June 16, 2019 § 1 Comment

3421DF9F-6127-4AC9-BF2F-BB6053D1A60F

I’m currently adapting to a new situation, which for some autistic people can be tough to handle. The need for time in which to integrate patterns and routines is not something I’d identified before my diagnosis of autism in 2016.

Now that I know about it I can follow the ups and downs of what I will l call my wrong-footings like the contours of a map. I’m almost in sync with my own discomfort (gasps from the gallery!) which is not supposed to be that common. Isn’t autism a ‘being out of sync’ thing? In some ways yes…

Yet, I’m not where I was pre-diagnosis, which is why I’m keen on identifying as autistic.  It helps me manage life in ways which are beneficial. Building a set of strategies  is key, I feel.

I’m suddenly part-time caring for my mum who is 93, and after a long lifetime of coping, is suddenly frail and in need of 24/7 care. It began with a punishing two week stay in hospital. My sister and I took shifts and made sure she was never unattended even at nighttime.

Autism made this a challenging job in some ways, but it also enabled me to maintain my focus on mum. I understood that I could tackle the rigours of a large and busy ward with its bright lights, constant noise, high social demands and substantial emotional labour, if I established routines and rituals. Two huge pluses were that the ward ran to a discernible daily routine, and that there were plenty of rules (these were variable according to staff but they were readable and a transgression could be decoded and added to my database).

My shifts were often 24 hours +. During each shift I travelled the same routes in and out of hospital carefully noting the landmarks until they formed part of  my inner landscape. I ate the same food every day, which I bought from the limited outlets on the hospital site. Creating familiarity and limiting choices spared my cognitive load and lowered anxiety levels.

An early moment of crisis came with a sudden change of location for mum. Without warning, on the third day of her admission a porter arrived and she was moved from the clinical decision unit (CDU) to a main ward in another building entirely. In addition to the new map I would need to input, we had shifted from a diagnostic ward of four women (CDU), to an individual side room on CDU, and now on to a ward with fourteen beds.

This all meant progress in medical terms but it had an impact on my ability to cope. I began badly on this ward due to wrong-footing. Give me no preparation time, change my environment, make that environment densely peopled (with no privacy) and I will be ‘flustered’.  Communication breakdown followed.

I’m glad it did. A delirious person in their 90s can’t advocate for themselves, and many physiological changes take place which can affect the ability to carry out basic bodily functions in an orderly fashion. Arriving on an elderly ward where staff don’t know your previous baseline functioning, and where these symptoms can be confused with dementia, can lead to conflict about how best to care for them.

Mum had been admitted with a urinary tract infection (UTI) and was finally on IV antibiotics. On our first night on this ward there was a moment at 4am, (having spent the night asking for bedpans a regular intervals, and trying to keep mum from falling out of bed) when I found myself on the sharp end of an auxiliary nurse’s tongue. I got a bollocking for want of a better word. Unbelievably (to me), I was told I was upsetting my mum and making her anxious, and that this was prompting her frequent urination.

It turned out that auxiliary night staff didn’t know she had a UTI (and significantly I didn’t know that they didn’t know!) I tried to explain that I didn’t know the rules of the ward yet, which seemed to be very different to the CDU, where it was okay to use the call button to ask for bedpans. As it happened, shifts differed. I quickly learned to update staff on mum’s current status, and to ask how we would handle toileting needs in the night with each incoming team. Communication and planning made all the difference.

This moment was signifiant. It could have been the moment of my unmasking. I seriously considered it, as I have sometimes done before in extremis. But I stood my ground – though I know that I looked horrified (I can tell when my face freezes and I openly stare at someone in disbelief). I have a very expressive face – which can get me into trouble! In the end I asked the nurse to leave me alone.  This felt appropriately assertive.

We subsequently patched things up and became best mates. I liked and admired her immensely, she was incredibly kind but had misread me. In turn I discovered her acute stress about the very real possibility of having to work a night shift alone the following evening (eventually a second nurse was found). The turning point came when I uttered a foul expletive that this could even be a thing. We were on the same side – pro NHS and anti cuts to frontline services.

There followed a conversation with the ward sister, who asked me if I was unhappy with the care on the ward. Together we unpicked events, and I stressed how appreciative I was of her staff, but that there had been a problem of communication.  I could have mentioned that I am autistic and need clear consistent communication. Again, I held back. Would this be useful when the misunderstanding was on both sides, and that staff had lacked crucial information? This was nothing to do with my autism.

I figured clarity would be important for any family member supporting their loved one in hospital, and nothing about the environment could be changed for me. Nurses were stretched beyond capacity, and my needs in this instance could be managed by me (my hyper focus and my myriad routines and rituals).

Significantly, I felt that staff would view me differently if I disclosed – and I needed to become part of the team somehow (and I did). If we were to get mum out in one piece, I had to mask-up. Due to systemic ableism I didn’t trust my unmasking wouldn’t create bias or prejudice against me and count against my ability to report accurately on my mother’s progress. As it happened, twice my pattern recognition skills proved vital to mum’s treatment. I don’t believe that I am wrong in thinking I would be taken less seriously, and where life and death were concerned I wasn’t prepared to do the research to find out.

I find that masking continues to be required beyond hospital, and in my care of my mum at home I’m navigating the boundaries of my masking even further.

I’m part of a growing team of carers as we get to experience a post hospital service which is on offer for six weeks in my mum’s local area. This has been fast-moving, as there is a window of time to claim it. All of this is so welcome but requires adjustment. The landscape changes, and it changes again.

The greatest change is in my time and my location. A split week is proving hard to adapt to, and this experience has felt what I imagine a small but significant house fire to be. I’ve lost a month and am slowly piecing together new routines and rituals. Forgive me if I owe you an email or a piece of work! I’m getting there.

In this piece I may have equated masking with ‘coping’, but I don’t quite mean it this way. I also seem to imply that if my autistic needs are met I can mask more easily, and that that’s a desirable state of affairs. I feel this may be true but am not advocating it for others. I’m just exploring what happened to me and I’m keen to ask questions of myself.

What I know I do have is a complex relationship with masking, which I want to be honest (and hopefully nuanced) about. Stigma exists, often we don’t have a choice (those of us who’ve learned masking as an adaptation).  For myself as a bilingual person, I have come to think of masking as a bilingualism, wrought by the necessity of living between worlds with different cultural norms.

I hope to write more about masking and caring as my situation evolves. I find it shocking to think that in a public healthcare setting I didn’t feel safe to unmask my autism. I didn’t feel confident that staff would have received sufficient training to accept my competence once unmasked.

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Tagged: , , , , , , ,

§ One Response to Masking and caring – an #actuallyautistic perspective.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

What’s this?

You are currently reading Masking and caring – an #actuallyautistic perspective. at The other side.

meta

%d bloggers like this: