diversity and a piece of white plastic

February 17, 2017 § Leave a comment

Brilliance. Another reblog – two in one day. I don’t reblog, have never reblogged but this this GOLD. Autist at Work has written brilliantly about the in-between spaces we find ourselves as artist professionals missing opportunity because we are in no category that is recognised or catered for. A must read for artists and arts professionals and anyone who cares about social justice in the arts.

autistatwork

Our autistic senses are tuned to pick up things, notice things, that others do not, as Rhi@OutFoxgloved wonderfully describes in this post ‘The day my autism saved my daughters life.’ Our always-on, delicate antennae are tuned into everything, so of course we can experience overload in NT environments, and fail to pick up things that seem obvious to NTs. We usually realise too late what someone meant when they were talking, as exact words and actions now sifted and processed, come back to us. In NT environments we can consequently be seen as slow, or uninterested, and underestimated.

Our thinking is immersive, our brains work overtime — whirring intensely and continually processing details coming from our senses, fitting them with our experience and skills, making unique connections. Sonia Boué‘s term ‘brain dancing’ describes this beautifully.

..into the museum

In one of the galleries is an extruded rectangular sheet of thin hard…

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